Common Vision Problems

Eye examinations often uncover a wide variety of vision problems. Below is a list of some of the more common vision problems found in patients of this practice.

Myopia (Short-sightedness)

Myopia is the condition where distant objects appear blurred because the image of the viewed object focuses in front of the eye’s retina instead of sharply upon the retina. Classically a myopic eye is longer that the average and or shows a steeply curved cornea. Spectacle and contact lenses are prescribed by the optometrist to correct this vision error. Myopia can also be corrected by refractive surgery such as LASIK in some cases.

Hyperopia (Long-sightedness)

Hyperopia is the condition where near objects can appear blurred, and in more significant cases distance vision too, because the image of the viewed object focuses behind the eye’s retina instead of sharply upon the retina. Classically a hyperopic eye is shorter that the average and or shows a flatter curved cornea. Spectacle and contact lenses are prescribed by the optometrist to correct this vision error. Hyperopia can also be corrected by refractive surgery in some cases.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is the condition where the cornea (front lens of the eye) or the crystalline lens within the eye is irregularly shaped. This irregular shape causes the vision to be distorted as the image of the viewed object does not focus to a single point on the retina. Blurred distance and near vision can result from astigmatism. Spectacle and contact lenses are prescribed by the optometrist to correct this vision error. Astigmatism can also be corrected by refractive surgery in some cases.

Presbyopia

Presbyopia is the condition where the crystalline lens inside the eye loses its ability to change its shape to focus near objects. As a result near objects appear blurred. Presbyopia is essentially an inevitable loss of near vision which generally becomes apparent between the ages of 40-45 and from there symptoms progress until the condition generally stabilise some 10-20 years later. Spectacle and contact lenses are prescribed by optometrists for this vision error. Presbyopia can also be corrected by refractive surgery in some cases.

Amblyopia (“Lazy-eye”)

Amblyopia is the condition where the vision of one of the patient’s eyes is reduced, a result of the eye and the brain not correctly communicating. This condition is sometimes referred to as “lazy eye”. This condition generally develops when there is a squint/turn or blurred vision (myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism) of the affected eye. Occasionally/rarely cataract and other ocular conditions/disease can be the cause amblyopia. It is sometimes possible to partly reverse amblyopia by treating the primary cause as well as using a number of other techniques such as patching and eye exercises. Success of treatment generally hinges on the age at which the problem is detected, generally before 6-9 is preferred, prior to the visual system becoming fully/permanently developed.